George Soros – winning in the markets and in life

George Soros is widely considered to be one of the greatest investors who have ever lived. Over the course of 45 years running his own hedge fund, Soros Fund Managment, Soros has managed to return over 25 percent per year, making him the undisputed king of returns over the recent history of the capital markets.

But unlike many of his plutocratic counterparts, Soros never had a great interest in acquiring vast wealth. On the contrary, for the majority of his formative years, Soros was primarily interested in the study of philosophy. After having enrolled at the London School of Economics, where he studied under famed philosophy professor Karl Popper, Soros had only one goal in life, to pursue the life of the mind and become a respected philosopher.

While at the London School of Economics, George Soros was heavily influenced by Popper’s seminal work, ‘The Open Society and Its Enemies’. The book had such a profound impact on the young Soros’ intellectual formation that he would later go on to name his flagship philanthropic organization after its title. The Open Society Foundations has become one of the most active philanthropic organizations in the world, directly contributing to the overthrow of tyrannical governments and working intensely for social change throughout America.

It was only upon graduating from the London School of Economics that Soros first realized that working as a professional philosopher would be a difficult row to hoe. Having a graduate degree in philosophy from the London School of Economics, he assumed that he would be able to easily find a job as a tenure-track professor. This was not to be the case. Visit this site to know more at opensocietyfoundations.org.

For a period of around five years, Soros bounced around from menial job to menial job, variously working as an itinerant salesman, a night clerk at a store and a salesman in a larger retail establishment. These jobs Soros found lacking in the extreme. He set about to find more meaningful work. A sense of ennui set in, and he endeavored to find more meaningful work. At the behest of a college friend, he applied to a Wall Street trading firm called Singer and Friedlander. This would turn out to be a seminal moment in Soros’s life. However, it was really nothing more than dumb luck that his first opportunity to work on Wall Street came about at all. Know more about George Soros on Investopedia.

Soros was amazed by how quickly he was hired at the firm. Over the next 15 years, Soros worked at a number of different trading firms and retail stock brokerage houses. Over this period, Soros learned the ins and outs of Wall Street, becoming a proficient navigator of the markets. His coworkers, however, noted that Soros was seemingly less interested in the routine of his daily work and more interested in developing his own philosophical ideas about the functioning of the capital markets.

Learn more: http://www.biography.com/people/george-soros-20926527